People who work in the healthcare industry constitute a large, diverse workforce looking after a predominantly vulnerable population.

Healthcare employees have the right to work in a healthy and safe workplace. Those utilising the services are entitled to safe care and support that is also concerned with their needs, freedoms and dignity. The CQC has set standards and guidelines to ensure this.

Managing different needs can sometimes present unique and complex situations which can, if not effectively managed, result in serious harm to employees, people using care services, and others.

The typical hazards include:

  • Moving and handling
  • Slips and Trips
  • Violence, aggression or challenging behaviour

Whilst specific hazards to people using care service may also include:

  • Falls from windows and balconies
  • Scalding and burning
  • Bedrail entrapment
  • Legionella

Thankfully, the risks to staff and service users can be minimised by providing sufficient training and equipment.

Our CRAMS software guides you through what you need to consider to make your organisation safe.

Domicilliary

The role, function and structures of community care services varies greatly from site to site. In addition, several workplace health and safety challenges can be identified on the geographical, physical and organisational environment that community care works across. The workplace health and safety challenges within these environments include:

  • Driving large distances between client’s homes and their base which lead to working in isolation for long periods and without adequate communication.
  • Encountering, managing and developing strategies to deal with poor client and carer behaviour
  • Working within and negotiating working environments such as the poor condition of patient homes and clients smoking
  • Navigating animals.
  • Vertical and horizontal violence
  • Workload, burnout and work-related stress

Thankfully, the risks to staff and service users can be minimised by providing training and equipment.

Our real-time, CRAMS software, guides you through what you need to consider in regard to your people, occupations, work-based tasks and employee competency to mitigate your exposure to risk making your organisation safe.

Doctors, Dentists, Clinics

Different types of healthcare facilities will have different risks.

There are many risks that could apply to different types of healthcare providers:

Doctors surgeries, clinics and dental surgeries all have a duty of care to its staff, patients and visitors. The practice partners have an overall responsibility of the health and safety of the practice, whilst the practice manager must ensure that health and safety arrangements are implemented. All personnel at the surgery have equal responsibility to ensure that they put into practice any procedures or instructions that they have received. They are responsible for themselves and others that they meet.

Healthcare personnel must also cooperate with the practices policies and must report any identified health and safety issues that emerge during the working day, that may have potential impact on the patients or others. Any person working outside the actual general practice medical centre, such as in the community, are also responsible to adhere to the policies of the centre and notify the practice manager of any potential hazards that they meet whilst in the community.

Thankfully, the risks to staff and service users can be minimised by providing training and equipment.

Our real-time, CRAMS software, guides you through what you need to consider in regard to your people, occupations, work-based tasks and employee competency to mitigate your exposure to risk making your organisation safe.

Hospice

Hospices need to ensure the general safety and welfare of all employees, volunteers, contractors, placements, consultants, patients and visitors.

To contribute to the success and longevity of hospice care, hospices need to ensure that Health and Safety is an essential and integral element when delivering the best palliative care to patients and their families and providing a wide range of successful fundraising activities.

With care being delivered by a specially trained multidisciplinary team supported by a large team of volunteers and furthermore, education departments often delivering palliative care education to the local community, fundraising departments managing a range of fundraising activities and retail shops in the local community that are often staffed by paid staff and volunteers, clarity, communication and co-operation between all employees, volunteers, trustees, patients and families, contractors and consultants from other agencies who work closely with hospice’s is vital to complying with the Management of Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

Thankfully, the risks to staff and service users can be minimised by providing training and equipment.

Our real-time, CRAMS software, guides you through what you need to consider in regard to your people, occupations, work-based tasks and employee competency to mitigate your exposure to risk making your organisation safe.

Healthcare

Care homes differ from other workplaces because they are not only places of work but are also homes for their residents. It is therefore important that they are pleasant places where the freedom and dignity of residents is respected, and where everyone’s health and safety is sensibly and effectively managed.

Good management of health and safety does not happen on its own and should be an integral part of the everyday running of your care home, and of the behaviours and attitudes displayed by all.

The core elements that are required to help you manage your health and safety are:

  • Good leadership and management
  • A trained and skilled (competent) healthcare workforce
  • An environment where people are consulted and feel involved

To help you determine if you are doing enough to manage health and safety, consider the following questions:

  • How does the home demonstrate its commitment to health and safety?
  • Are your arrangements to control the real risks people are facing working?
  • How well do you know what is happening in the home – are there effective checks in place?
  • Have you learned from situations where things have gone wrong?
  • Is health and safety an integral part of your day-to-day process for running your care home?

Managing for health and safety requires a sustained and systematic approach. While this may not always require a formal health and safety management system, your approach is likely to follow the steps: Plan, Do, Check and Act:
Plan – say what needs to happen and say how you will achieve it.
Do – profile the risks you identify, organise your activities to deliver your plan, decide on the preventive measures, and ensure there are systems and equipment in place to do the job safely.

Our CRAMS software guides you through what you need to consider to make your healthcare organisation safe.

violence

Good management of health and safety does not happen on its own and should be an integral part of the everyday running of the hospital, and of the behaviours and attitudes displayed by all.

Hospitals should ensure that all employees have rewarding and worthwhile jobs, with the freedom and confidence to be empowered to raise health and safety concerns where appropriate. To do this, employees need to be trusted, empowered and actively listened to by those with whom they work and interact. Employees must be treated with respect at work, and be given the tools, training and support to work safely with opportunities to develop and progress.

Our CRAMS software guides you through what you need to consider to make your organisation safe.